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Discover Different Types of Orchids

Discover Different Types of Orchids

Did you know there are more than 30,000 types of orchids, each with unique characteristics? It’s true. In fact, these exotic plants grow on every single continent (except Antarctica). If you love orchids as much as we do, you’re probably eager to discover these orchid types.

First, let’s brush up on your Phalaenopsis orchid knowledge, courtesy of the American Orchid Society.

If you’re a regular reader of the Just Add Ice® blog, you’re already familiar with their long-lasting and simple-care characteristics, which make them such a crowd pleaser. Their high success rate and widespread availability make them an easy item to buy again and again. This also makes them great gifts for any recipient, no matter their skill level. (Our extensive library of orchid care resources also helps; for instance, you can find tips on proper phalaenopsis orchid care in this short guide.)

Although we are partial to the Phalaenopsis orchid, we love all types of orchids and can’t deny that there are many interesting varieties out there. Here are some other well-known orchid types to discover:

Angraecum

types-of-orchids-angraecum

(Source: The American Orchid Society)

Discovered by Charles Darwin, the Agraecum orchid is a well-known species known for dramatic star-like leathery white blooms and their mid-winter blooming cycle. These two characteristics lends the orchid to its most common names, the "Comet orchid" and “Christmas orchid”. The bright white color and strong fragrance at night makes them attractive to moths, who help pollinate this monopodial species.

Dendrobium

types-of-orchids-Dendrobium

(Source: The American Orchid Society)

The Dendrobium Nobilé originates from South-East Asia, the Himalayan region, Malaysia, South China and Japan. It differentiates itself from the other orchid species with a stalk-like structure and the cluster of scented trumpet-like flowers which form opposite the axil of each leaf. The meaning of this orchid is refinement and beauty. They are popular in wedding bouquets and centerpiece sprays.

Cattleya

types-of-orchids-Cattleya

(Source: The American Orchid Society)

The popular Cattleya orchid is known as the “Queen of Orchids” due to its immaculate look. Known as epiphytes, they grow on trees or rocks and have bulb-like water-storage organs. They are often used as centerpiece flowers due to their long-lasting nature and aroma.

Cymbidium

types-of-orchids-Cymbidium

(Source: The American Orchid Society)

Also known as “boat orchids,” these eye-catching flowers produce sprays with dozens of large, brightly-colored blooms. They are characterized by thick roots and long, thin leaves which originate out of bulbs. They work well as cut flowers on corsages because their waxy appearance and ability to maintain their look for long periods once cut.

Paphiopedilum

Types-of-orchids-Paphiopedilum

(Source: The American Orchid Society)

Appropriately known as the “lady slipper orchid”, the Paphiopedilum’s pouch-shaped bloom is designed to trap insects as a way of increasing the likelihood of pollination. Additionally, the presence of duel anthers are a unique characteristic that allows them to produce double the amount of pollen. They’re characterized by blooms and leaves that are often speckled or mottled.

If you’re not ready to branch out and take on the challenge of a new type of orchid, the Phalaenopsis has many varieties to try. In fact, we grow over 150 different varieties here at our Just Add Ice® greenhouses that we have tested to be durable and long-lasting. We’re always testing new varieties, so stay on the lookout for interesting colors and patterns to collect.

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